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Magnum Photos is an international photographic cooperative of great diversity and distinction founded in 1947 by four pioneering photographers: Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, George Rodger and David Seymour. Today it is still owned by its photographer members, who with powerful individual vision, chronicle the world and interpret its peoples, events, issues and personalities.

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Bob Henriques DISCOVER BOB HENRIQUES'S ARTWORKS >

Bob Henriques (born 1930) is a photojournalist associated with Magnum Photos known for candid portraits of notable people, including Marilyn Monroe, Fidel Castro, Robert F. Kennedy, and Martin Luther King, Jr. He was active during the 1950s and 1960s. Henriques was born as Robert Granville Henriques on February 1, 1930 and currently lives in Homestead, Florida. His photography is known for its focus on famous icons, as he often worked on the sets of major motion pictures, such as The Seven Year Itch and Long Day's Journey Into Night as well as for major magazines. His work has been included in exhibitions in Germany at Kunsthaus Hamburg as well as in the United States at Staley + Wise Gallery in New York City and in the Print Room at Magnum Photos. Some of his photos are now in the Magnum Archive housed at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

Bruce Gilden DISCOVER BRUCE GILDEN'S ARTWORKS >

Bruce Gilden, born in 1946, lives in New York City and observes urban behaviors and customs, with a particular focus on strong characters and their individual peculiarities. He has said “I'm known for taking pictures very close, and the older I get, the closer I get. ” Gilden’s subjects have included the intimacy of bodies sprawled across the legendary New York beach of Coney Island (1986), people in New Orleans during its famous Mardi Gras festival and the people of Haiti. Gilden joined Magnum in 1998. He tackled a new approach to the streets of New York City, where he had been working since 1981, and his work culminated in the publication of ‘Facing New York’ (1992), and ‘A Beautiful Catastrophe’ (2005). Gilden has received numerous awards, including the European Award for Photography, three National Endowment for the Arts fellowships, and a Japan Foundation fellowship.

Bruno Barbey DISCOVER BRUNO BARBEY'S ARTWORKS >

Bruno Barbey is a Frenchman born in Morocco in 1941, and is known for his free and harmonious use of color. He has said “Photography is the only language that can be understood anywhere in the world”. Barbey became a member of Magnum in 1968, the year he documented the political unrest and student riots in Paris, and he served as Magnum vice president for Europe in 1978 and 1979 and as President of Magnum International from 1992 - 1995 Over four decades Barbey has journeyed across five continents and into numerous military conflicts. Although he rejects the label of 'war photographer', he has covered civil wars in Nigeria, Vietnam, the Middle East, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Northern Ireland, Iraq and Kuwait. His work has appeared in most of the world's major magazines. He has received many awards for his work, including the French National Order of Merit. His photographs have been exhibited internationally, most recently in France, Oman, Turkey and Brazil.

Burt Glinn DISCOVER BURT GLINN'S ARTWORKS >

Burt Glinn became an associate member of Magnum in 1951, along with Eve Arnold and Dennis Stock - the first Americans to join the young photo agency - and a full member in 1954. He made his mark with spectacular color series on the South Seas, Japan, Russia, Mexico and California. In 1959 he received the Mathew Brady Award for Magazine Photographer of the Year from the University of Missouri. In collaboration with the writer Laurens van der Post, Glinn published A Portrait of All the Russias and A Portrait of Japan. His reportages have appeared in Esquire, Geo, Travel and Leisure, Fortune, Life and Paris-Match. He has covered the Sinai War, the US Marine invasion of Lebanon, and Fidel Castro's takeover of Cuba. Versatile and technically brilliant, Glinn is one of Magnum's great corporate and advertising photographers. He has received numerous awards for his editorial and commercial photography, including the Best Book of Photographic Reporting from Abroad from the Overseas Press Club and the Best Print Ad of the Year from the Art Directors Club of New York. Glinn has served as president of the American Society of Media Photographers. He was president of Magnum between 1972 and 1975, and was re-elected to the post in 1987.

Christopher Anderson DISCOVER CHRISTOPHER ANDERSON'S ARTWORKS >

Christopher Anderson was born in Canada in 1970 and grew up in West Texas. He first gained recognition for his pictures in 1999 when he boarded a handmade, wooden boat with Haitian refugees trying to sail to America. The boat, named ‘the Believe In God’, sank in the Caribbean. In 2000 the images from that journey would receive the Robert Capa Gold Medal. They would also mark the emergence of an emotionally charged style that has come to characterize his work since. Christopher is the author of two monographs: Nonfiction, published in 2003 and CAPITOLIO, published in 2009 by RM and named one of the best photography books of 2009/10 at the Kassel Photo Book Festival in Germany. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Constantine Manos DISCOVER CONSTANTINE MANOS'S ARTWORKS >

Constantine Manos was born in 1934 in South Carolina to Greek immigrant parents. His photographic career began when he was thirteen, in the school camera club, and within a few years he was a professional photographer. At the age of 19 he was hired as the official photographer of the Boston Symphony Orchestra at Tanglewood. After military service, he moved to New York, where he worked for Esquire, Life and Look. His book Portrait of a Symphony, on the Boston Symphony Orchestra, was published in 1961. For the next three years, he lived in Greece, producing work that resulted in A Greek Portfolio, first published in 1972 and award-winner at Arles and at the Leipzig Book Fair. In 1963 Manos joined Magnum Photos. Manos's work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House in Rochester, and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta.

David Alan Harvey DISCOVER DAVID ALAN HARVEY'S ARTWORKS >

Born in San Francisco, David Alan Harvey was raised in Virginia. He discovered photography at the age of 11. Harvey purchased a used Leica with savings from his newspaper route and began photographing his family and neighborhood in 1956. When he was 20 he lived with and documented the lives of a black family living in Norfolk, Virginia, and the resulting book, Tell It Like It Is, was published in 1966. He was named Magazine Photographer of the Year by the National Press Photographers Association in 1978. Harvey went on to shoot over forty essays for National Geographic Magazine. He has covered stories around the world, including projects on French teenagers, the Berlin Wall, Maya culture, Vietnam, Native Americans, Mexico and Naples, and a recent feature on Nairobi. He has published two major books, Cuba and Divided Soul, based on his extensive work on the Spanish cultural migration into the Americas, and his book Living Proof (2007) deals with hip-hop culture. His work has been exhibited at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Nikon Gallery, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Harvey is founder and editor of the award-winning Burn magazine, featuring iconic and emerging photographers in print and online. Harvey joined Magnum as a nominee in 1993 and became a full member in 1997. He lives in New York City.

David Hurn DISCOVER DAVID HURN'S ARTWORKS >

David Hurn famously photographs ‘things as-they-are’. His most celebrated pictures of the Beatles from the 1960s shows his spontaneous style that shows the ‘complexity, wonder and surprise’ of life. Born in 1934 in the UK of Welsh descent, David Hurn began his career in 1955 as an assistant at the Reflex Agency. While a freelance photographer, he gained his reputation with his reportage of the 1956 Hungarian revolution. He became an associate member of Magnum in 1965 and a full member in 1967. Hurn eventually turned away from coverage of current affairs, preferring to take a more personal approach to photography. In 1973 he set up the famous School of Documentary Photography in Newport, Wales, and has produced carefully observed photographs that reveal both the traditional and the modern sides of the country. David Hurn has a longstanding international reputation as one of Britain's leading reportage photographers. He continues to live and work in Wales.

David Seymour DISCOVER DAVID SEYMOUR'S ARTWORKS >

David Szymin was born in 1911 in Warsaw . After studying printing in Leipzig and chemistry and physics at the Sorbonne in the 1930s, Szymin stayed on in Paris. Szymin - or 'Chim' - began working as a freelance photographer. From 1934, his picture stories appeared regularly in Paris-Soir and Regards. Through Maria Eisner and the new Alliance agency, Chim met Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Capa. From 1936 to 1938 Chim photographed the Spanish Civil War, and after it was over he went to Mexico on an assignment with a group of Spanish Republican émigrés. At the outbreak of the Second World War he moved to New York, where he adopted the name David Seymour. Both his parents were killed by the Nazis. Seymour served in the US Army (1942-45), winning a medal for his work in intelligence. In 1947, along with Cartier-Bresson, Capa, George Rodger, and William Vandivert, he founded Magnum Photos. The following year he was commissioned by UNICEF to photograph Europe's children in need. He went on to photograph major stories across Europe, Hollywood stars on European locations, and the emergence of the State of Israel. After Robert Capa's death he became the new president of Magnum. He held this post until 10 November 1956, when, traveling near the Suez Canal to cover a prisoner exchange, he was killed by Egyptian machine-gun fire.

Dennis Stock DISCOVER DENNIS STOCK'S ARTWORKS >

Dennis Stock (1928-2010) evokes the spirit of America through his iconic portraits of Hollywood stars, most notably James Dean and Audrey Hepburn. In 1947 he became an apprentice to Life magazine photographer Gjon Mili and won first prize in ‘Life's Young Photographers’ contest. He joined Magnum in 1951. From 1957 to 1960 Stock photographed some of the world’s most celebrated jazz musicians, including Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday, Sidney Bechet, Gene Krupa and Duke Ellington for his book ‘Jazz Street’. Stock generated a book or an exhibition almost every year since the 1950s. He exhibited his work widely in France, Germany, Italy, the United States and Japan. He worked as a writer, director and producer for television and film, and his photographs have been acquired by most major museum collections. He served as president of Magnum's film and new media division in 1969 and 1970.

Elliott Erwitt DISCOVER ELLIOTT ERWITT'S ARTWORKS >

Born in Paris in 1928 to Russian parents, Erwitt spent his childhood in Milan, then emigrated to the US, via France, with his family in 1939. As a teenager living in Hollywood, he developed an interest in photography, traveling around the world with his trusty Rolleiflex camera. In 1953 Erwitt joined Magnum Photos and worked as a freelance photographer for Collier's, Look, Life, Holiday and other luminaries of that golden period for illustrated magazines. In the late 1960s he served as Magnum's president for three years. Erwitt became known for the benevolent irony and the humanistic sensibility traditional to the spirit of Magnum. In the last few years he has continued to work for a variety of journalistic and commercial outfits.

Eve Arnold DISCOVER EVE ARNOLD'S ARTWORKS >

Renowned for her photographs of Marilyn Monroe, Eve Arnold (1912-2012) is one of the world’s most celebrated female photographers. Born in Philadelphia to Russian immigrant parents, she studied photography with Alexei Brodovitch at the New School for Social Research in New York. Arnold first became associated with Magnum Photos in 1951, and became a full member in 1957. She was based in the US during the 1950s but went to England in 1962 and, except for a six-year interval when she worked in the US and China, she lived in the UK for the rest of her life. Her time in China led to her first major solo exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum in 1980. In 1995 she was made fellow of the Royal Photographic Society and elected Master Photographer by New York's International Center of Photography. In 1996 she received the Kraszna-Krausz Book Award for ‘In Retrospect’ and in 2003 was granted an Order of the British Empire. She has had twelve books published, including most recently ‘Eve's Arnold's People’, Thames & Hudson, UK (2009) and ‘Marilyn Monroe by Eve Arnold’, Washington Green/Halcyon, UK; Harry A. Abrams, USA (2005).

Ferdinando Scianna DISCOVER FERDINANDO SCIANNA'S ARTWORKS >

Ferdinando Scianna started taking photographs in the 1960s while studying literature, philosophy and art history at the University of Palermo. It was then that he began to photograph the Sicilian people systematically. Feste Religiose in Sicilia (1965) included an essay by the Sicilian writer Leonardo Sciascia, and it was the first of many collaborations with famous writers. Scianna moved to Milan in 1966. The following year he started working for the weekly magazine L'Europeo, first as a photographer, then from 1973 as a journalist. He also wrote on politics for Le Monde Diplomatique and on literature and photography for La Quinzaine Littéraire. In 1977 he published Les Siciliens in France and La Villa Dei Mostri in Italy. During this period Scianna met Henri Cartier-Bresson, and in 1982 he joined Magnum Photos. He entered the field of fashion photography in the late 1980s. At the end of the decade he published a retrospective, Le Forme del Caos (1989). Scianna returned to exploring the meaning of religious rituals with Viaggio a Lourdes (1995), then two years later he published a collection of images of sleepers - Dormire Forse Sognare (To Sleep, Perchance to Dream). In 2002 Scianna completed Quelli di Bagheria, a book on his home town in Sicily, in which he tries to reconstruct the atmosphere of his youth through writings and photographs of Bagheria and the people who live there.

George Rodger DISCOVER GEORGE RODGER'S ARTWORKS >

Born in Cheshire, George Rodger served in the British Merchant Navy. After a short spell in America, he worked as a photographer for the BBC's The Listener magazine, followed in 1938 by a brief stint working for the Black Star Agency. His pictures of the London blitz brought him to the attention of Life magazine, and he became a war correspondent. He won eighteen campaign medals covering Free French activities in West Africa, and went on to document the war front in Eritrea, Abyssinia and the Western Desert. He travelled to Iran, Burma, North Africa, Sicily and Salerno, Italy, where he met and befriended Robert Capa. Having covered the liberation of France, Belgium and Holland, Rodger was the first photographer to enter Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in April 1945. In May he photographed the German surrender at Lüneburg for Time and Life. Traumatized by the experience of looking for 'nice compositions' in front of the dead, Rodger embarked on a 28,000-mile journey all over Africa and the Middle East, focusing on animal life, rituals, and ways of life that exist in a close relationship with nature. In 1947 Rodger was invited to join Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, David Seymour and William Vandivert in founding Magnum. His next major trip was a Cape-to-Cairo trans-Africa journey, during which he made extraordinary pictures of the Kordofan Nuba tribe which first appeared in National Geographic in 1951. Africa remained a preoccupation for him for over thirty years. Enormously successful during his lifetime, George Rodger died in Kent on 24 July 1995.

Guy Le Querrec DISCOVER GUY LE QUERREC'S ARTWORKS >

Born in 1941 in Paris into a modest family from Brittany, Guy Le Querrec shot his first pictures of jazz musicians in London in the late 1950s, making his professional debut in 1967. Two years later he was hired by the weekly Jeune Afrique as picture editor and photographer; he did his first reportages in Francophone Africa, including Chad, Cameroon and Niger. In 1971 he entrusted his archives to Vu, recently founded by Pierre de Fenoyl, and in 1972 he co-founded the co-operative Viva agency, but left it three years later. Le Querrec joined Magnum in 1976. In the late 1970s he co-directed two films, and in 1980 directed the first photo-graphic workshop organized by the City of Paris. During the Rencontres d'Arles in 1983 he created a new form of show by projecting photographs alongside a live quartet of jazz musicians, repeating the experiment in 1993 and 2006. Le Querrec has undertaken numerous reportages on the Concert Mayol in Paris, subjects in China and Africa, and North American Indians. He punctuates his work with breaks devoted to jazz (festivals, clubs and tours), and has traveled through twenty-five African countries with the Romano-Sclavis-Texier trio. Le Querrec's background in jazz has informed his photography. He sees everyday scenes as a musical score, played or activated by natural forces. Sun rays in a café could be a cry or a trumpet call; Spanish workers resting on the edge of a limestone quarry are musical notations in a solo piece. Le Querrec has also devoted much time to teaching workshops and classes in France and other countries. He has exhibited regularly throughout the world.

Herbert List DISCOVER HERBERT LIST'S ARTWORKS >

Herbert List was a classically educated artist who combined a love for photography with a fascination for surrealism and classicism. Born in 1903 into a prosperous Hamburg merchant family, List began an apprenticeship at a Heidelberg coffee dealer in 1921 while studying literature and art history at Heidelberg University. During travels for the coffee business between 1924-28, the young List began to take photographs, almost without any pretensions to art. Under the dual influence of the surrealist movement on the one hand, and of Bauhaus artists on the other, List photographed still life and his friends, developing his own style. His austere, classically-posed black-and-white composition taken in Italy and Greece have been highly formative for modern photography.

Hiroji Kubota DISCOVER HIROJI KUBOTA'S ARTWORKS >

During a visit by Magnum members to Japan in 1961, Hiroji Kubota came to know René Burri, Burt Glinn and Elliott Erwitt. After graduating in political science from Tokyo's University of Waseda in 1962, Kubota moved to the US, settling in Chicago, where he continued photographing while supporting himself by working in a Japanese catering business. Kubota's awards in Japan include the Nendo Sho, Annual Award of the Japanese Photographic Society (1982), and the Mainichi Art Prize (1983). Kubota has had solo shows in Tokyo, Osaka, Beijing, New York, Washington, Rome, London, Vienna, Paris and many other cities. He has just completed Japan, a book on his homeland and the country where he continues to be based.

Jean Gaumy DISCOVER JEAN GAUMY'S ARTWORKS >

Born in August 1948 in Pontaillac (Charente-Maritime), France, Gaumy attended school in Toulouse and Aurillac. He received his higher education in Rouen where he worked as editor and freelance photographer in a local daily newspaper to pay for his studies. In 1975 he undertook two long works on subjects never before broached in France: the first L’Hôpital was published in 1976; the second, Les Incarcérés, on French prisons was made in 1976 and published in 1983 with extracts from his personal journal written in the first person. In 1977 he joined Magnum after he was noticed at the photography festival, Rencontres d’Arles, in 1976 by Marc Riboud and Bruno Barbey. In 1984 he made his first film La Boucane, which was nominated for a Caesar in 1986 for best documentary. Other often award-winning films followed, all broadcast by French and European television. He received the Prix Nadar in 2001. Since 2005 he has undertaken location scouting and shoots for the film Sous Marin spending four months underwater aboard a nuclear attack submarine. His numerous works on human confinement have been coupled with a more contemplative photographic approach in recent years. In 2008, after his film aboard a nuclear submarine, he started photographic reconnaissance work that has already taken him from the arctic seas to the contaminated lands of Chernobyl and Fukushima. He has been living in Fécamp, Haute Normandie (Upper Normandy, France) since 1995.

Jonas Bendiksen DISCOVER JONAS BENDIKSEN'S ARTWORKS >

Jonas Bendiksen focuses on the forgotten stories behind the big headlines of world events. Born in 1977, he spent several years in Russia photographing stories from the fringes of the former Soviet Union, later published as the book ‘Satellites’ (2006). In 2005, with a grant from the Alicia Patterson Foundation, he started working on The Places We Live, a project on the growth of urban slums across the world, which combines still photography, projections and voice recordings to create three-dimensional installations. Bendiksen has received numerous awards, including the 2003 ‘Infinity Award’ from the International Center of Photography, New York, and first prize in the ‘Pictures of the Year’ International Awards. His editorial clients include National Geographic, Geo, Newsweek, the Independent on Sunday Review, the Sunday Times Magazine, the Telegraph Magazine, and the Rockefeller Foundation.

Leonard Freed DISCOVER LEONARD FREED'S ARTWORKS >

Born in Brooklyn, New York, to working-class Jewish parents of Eastern European descent, Leonard Freed first wanted to become a painter. However, he began taking photographs while in the Netherlands in 1953, and discovered that this was where his passion lay. In 1954, after trips through Europe and North Africa, he returned to the United States and studied in Alexei Brodovitch's ‘design laboratory'. He moved to Amsterdam in 1958 and photographed the Jewish community there. He pursued this concern in numerous books and films, examining German society and his own Jewish roots; his book on the Jews in Germany was published in 1961, and Made in Germany, about post-war Germany, appeared in 1965. Working as a freelance photographer from 1961 onwards, Freed began to travel widely, photographing blacks in America (1964-65), events in Israel (1967-68), the Yom Kippur War in 1973, and the New York City police department (1972-79). He also shot four films for Japanese, Dutch and Belgian television. Freed joined Magnum in 1972. His coverage of the American civil rights movement first made him famous, but he also produced major essays on Poland, Asian immigration in England, North Sea oil development, and Spain after Franco. Photography became Freed's means of exploring societal violence and racial discrimination. Leonard Freed died in Garrison, New York, on 30 November 2006.

Marc Riboud DISCOVER MARC RIBOUD'S ARTWORKS >

Marc Riboud is best known for his extensive reports on the East: The Three Banners of China (1966), Face of North Vietnam (1970), Visions of China (1981) and his recent In China (1996). Born in Lyon in 1923, Riboud was invited to join Magnum by Cartier-Bresson and Capa in Paris in 1952. He became a full member of Magnum in 1955 and served as president of Magnum from 1975-76. In 1968, 1972 and 1976, Riboud made several reportages on North Vietnam and later traveled all over the world, but mostly in Asia, Africa, the US and Japan. Riboud's photographs have appeared in numerous magazines, including Life, Géo, National Geographic, Paris-Match, Stern. He twice won the Overseas Press Club Award (1966 and 1970), and has had major retrospective exhibitions at the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (1985) and the International Center of Photography, New York (1988 and 1997).

Martin Parr DISCOVER MARTIN PARR'S ARTWORKS >

Martin Parr was born in 1952 in Surrey, England, and became a member of Magnum in 1994, after much heated debate over his provocative photographic style. In 2002 The Barbican Art Gallery and the National Media Museum initiated a mid-career retrospective of his work, accompanied by a monograph published by Phaidon. To date, Martin Parr has been involved in the publication of over 100 books and remains a huge influence on contemporary photography.

Martin Parr DISCOVER MARTIN PARR'S ARTWORKS >

Martin Parr was born in 1952 in Surrey, England, and became a member of Magnum in 1994, after much heated debate over his provocative photographic style. In 2002 The Barbican Art Gallery and the National Media Museum initiated a mid-career retrospective of his work, accompanied by a monograph published by Phaidon. To date, Martin Parr has been involved in the publication of over 100 books and remains a huge influence on contemporary photography.

Paolo Pellegrin DISCOVER PAOLO PELLEGRIN'S ARTWORKS >

Paolo Pellegrin was born in 1964 in Rome. He studied architecture at L'Università la Sapienza, Rome, Italy. After three years, he decided to change career directions and left to study photography. He became a Magnum Photos nominee in 2001 and a full member in 2005. He is a contract photographer for Newsweek magazine. Pellegrin is a winner of many awards, including nine World Press Photo awards and numerous Photographer of the Year awards, a Leica Medal of Excellence, an Olivier Rebbot Award, the Hansel-Meith Preis, and the Robert Capa Gold Medal Award. In 2006, he was assigned the W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography. He lives in New York and Rome. His books include Paolo Pellegrin (Kunstfoyer der Versicherungskammer Bayern 2012), Dies Irae (Contrasto, Italy, 2011); Paolo Pellegrin (Actes Sud, 2010); As I Was Dying (Actes Sud, France, 2007); Double Blind (Trolley, 2007); Kosovo 1999-2000: The Flight of Reason (Trolley, USA, 2002); L'au delà est là (Le Point du Jour, France, 2001); Cambogia (Federico Motta Editore, Italy, 1998) and Bambini (Sinnos, Italy, 1997)

Paul Fusco DISCOVER PAUL FUSCO'S ARTWORKS >

Paul Fusco worked as a photographer with the United States Army Signal Corps in Korea from 1951 to 1953, before studying photojournalism at Ohio University, where he received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1957. He moved to New York City and started his career as a staff photographer with Look, where he remained until 1971. In this role he produced important reportages on social issues in the US, including the plight of destitute miners in Kentucky; Latino ghetto life in New York City; cultural experimentation in California; African-American life in the Mississippi delta; religious proselytizing in the South; and migrant laborers. He also worked in England, Israel, Egypt, Japan, Southeast Asia, Brazil, Chile and Mexico, and made an extended study of the Iron Curtain countries, from northern Finland to Iran. After Look closed down, Fusco approached Magnum Photos, becoming an associate in 1973 and a full member the following year. His photography has been published widely in major US magazines including Time, Life, Newsweek, the New York Times Magazine, Mother Jones and Psychology Today, as well as in other publications worldwide.

Peter Marlow DISCOVER PETER MARLOW'S ARTWORKS >

Although gifted in the language of photojournalism, Peter Marlow is not a photojournalist. He was initially, however, one of the most enterprising and successful young British news photographers, and in 1976 joined the Sygma agency in Paris. He soon found that he lacked the necessary appetite for the job while on assignment in Lebanon and Northern Ireland during the late 1970s; he discovered that the stereotype of the concerned photojournalist disguised the disheartening reality of dog-eat-dog competition between photographers hunting fame at all costs. Since those days, Marlow's aesthetic has shifted - in that he makes mainly color photographs - but his approach is unchanged. The color of incidental things became central to his pictures in the same way that the shape and mark of things had been central to his black-and-white work. Marlow has come full circle. He started his career as an international photojournalist, returned to Britain to examine his own experience, and discovered a new visual poetry that enabled him to understand his homeland. Having found this poetry, he has taken it back on the road: he now photographs as much in Japan, the USA and elsewhere in Europe as he does in the UK.

Philippe Halsman DISCOVER PHILIPPE HALSMAN'S ARTWORKS >

Philippe Halsman (1906-1979) was born in Riga, Latvia, and began to take photographs in Paris in the 1930s. He opened a portrait studio in Montparnasse in 1934, where he photographed André Gide, Marc Chagall, André Malraux, Le Corbusier and other writers and artists. Halsman began a thirty-seven-year collaboration with Salvador Dalí in 1941 which resulted in a stream of unusual 'photographs of ideas', including 'Dalí Atomicus' and the 'Dalí's Mustache' series. In the early 1950s, Halsman began to ask his subjects to jump for his camera at the conclusion of each sitting. These uniquely witty and energetic images have become an important part of his photographic legacy. Philippe Halsman died in New York City on June 25th, 1979.

Stuart Franklin DISCOVER STUART FRANKLIN'S ARTWORKS >

Stuart Franklin (born London, 16 July 1956) is a photographer, a member of Magnum Photos, and a former President of Magnum Photos (2006–2009). From 1980 until 1985, Franklin worked with Agence Presse Sygma in Paris. During that time he photographed the civil war in Lebanon, unemployed people in Britain, famine in Sudan and the Heysel Stadium disaster. Joining Magnum Photos in 1985, he became a full member in 1989. In the same year, Franklin photographed the uprising in Tiananmen Square and shot one of the "tank man" photographs, earning him a World Press Photo Award. In 1989 Franklin traveled with Greenpeace to Antarctica. He worked on about twenty stories for National Geographic between 1991 and 2009, subjects including Inca conqueror Francisco Pizarro and the hydro-struggle in Quebec and places such as Buenos Aires and Malaysia. In addition, he worked on book and cultural projects. During 2009 Franklin curated an exhibition on Gaza - "Point of No Return" for the Noorderlicht Photo Festival. Currently Franklin is working on two new books.

Thomas Hoepker DISCOVER THOMAS HOEPKER'S ARTWORKS >

Thomas Hoepker, born in 1936, specializes in reportage and stylish color features, famously saying, “I am not an artist. I am an image maker”. His photographs of the boxing champion Muhammad Ali are typically iconic. Hoepker worked as a photographer for ‘Münchner Illustrierte’ and ‘Kristall’ between 1960 and 1963, reporting from all over the world. He joined Stern magazine as a photo-reporter in 1964 and worked as their New York correspondent from 1976. From 1978 to 1981 Hoepker was director of photography for the American edition of Geo. Hoepker became a full member of Magnum in 1989 was president of Magnum Photos from 2003 to 2006. He received the prestigious ‘Kulturpreis’ of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Photographie in 1968. Today Hoepker lives in New York. A retrospective exhibition, showing 230 images from fifty years of work, toured Germany and other parts of Europe in 2007.

Trent Parke DISCOVER TRENT PARKE'S ARTWORKS >

Born in 1971, Trent Parke is the only Australian photographer to be represented by Magnum. He transforms everyday scenes into poetic landscapes by his use of light. He has said “I am forever chasing light. Light turns the ordinary into the magical”. In 2003, Parke drove almost 90,000 km around Australia and produced a portrait of 21st century Australia entitled ‘Minutes to Midnight’. In 2006, the entire ‘Minutes to Midnight’ exhibition was acquired by the National Gallery of Australia. Parke won World Press Photo Awards in 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2005, and in 2006 was granted the ABN AMRO Emerging Artist Award. He was selected to be part of the World Press Photo Masterclass in 1999. Parke has exhibited widely and published two books, ‘Dream/Life’ (1999), and ‘The Seventh Wave’ (2000).

Werner Bischof DISCOVER WERNER BISCHOF'S ARTWORKS >

Werner Bischof (1916 –1954) was the first photographer to join Magnum after the founding members in 1949. He was born in Switzerland and his moving and poetic work received international recognition after the publication of his 1945 reportage on the devastation caused by the Second World War. Bischof traveled in Italy and Greece for Swiss Relief, an organization dedicated to post-war reconstruction. In 1948 he photographed the Winter Olympics in St Moritz for Life magazine. After trips to Eastern Europe, Finland, Sweden and Denmark, he worked for Picture Post, The Observer, Illustrated and Epoca. He was sent to report on famine in India by Life magazine (1951), and he went on to work in Japan, Korea, Hong Kong and Indochina. The images from these reportages were used in major picture magazines throughout the world.

"Magnum is a community of thought, a shared human quality, a curiosity about what is going on in the world, a respect for what is going on and a desire to transcribe it visually."

Henri Cartier-Bresson
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