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MAGNUM PHOTOS - Photograph

View from 102nd floor observation balcony in New York City, 1950.

Photograph

MAGNUM PHOTOS 

Artwork by George Rodger

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$ 650.00
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  • Composition: Fine Art Giclée print, brown frame, Acid-free 100% cotton paper
  • Dimensions: Height: 12.29 inches Width: 12.29 inches
  • Product code:58012617HF

You will receive your artwork in 15 to 20 days from ordering. Due to special handling and documentation, we require a little longer than our regular delivery times.

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About the work
View from 102nd floor observation balcony in New York City, 1950 by George Rodger. Fine art giclée print on acid-free 100% cotton paper, brown wooden frame. 150-piece edition. Authenticated. Measurements of photographic print only: 20,5 x 20,5 cm. View from 102nd floor observation balcony of the Empire State Building. “If a photographer cares about the people before the lens and is compassionate, much is given. It is the photographer, not the camera, that is the instrument.”
About the artist
Born in Cheshire, George Rodger served in the British Merchant Navy. After a short spell in America, he worked as a photographer for the BBC's The Listener magazine, followed in 1938 by a brief stint working for the Black Star Agency. His pictures of the London blitz brought him to the attention of Life magazine, and he became a war correspondent. He won eighteen campaign medals covering Free French activities in West Africa, and went on to document the war front in Eritrea, Abyssinia and the Western Desert. He travelled to Iran, Burma, North Africa, Sicily and Salerno, Italy, where he met and befriended Robert Capa. Having covered the liberation of France, Belgium and Holland, Rodger was the first photographer to enter Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in April 1945. In May he photographed the German surrender at Lüneburg for Time and Life. Traumatized by the experience of looking for 'nice compositions' in front of the dead, Rodger embarked on a 28,000-mile journey all over Africa and the Middle East, focusing on animal life, rituals, and ways of life that exist in a close relationship with nature. In 1947 Rodger was invited to join Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, David Seymour and William Vandivert in founding Magnum. His next major trip was a Cape-to-Cairo trans-Africa journey, during which he made extraordinary pictures of the Kordofan Nuba tribe which first appeared in National Geographic in 1951. Africa remained a preoccupation for him for over thirty years. Enormously successful during his lifetime, George Rodger died in Kent on 24 July 1995.