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MAGNUM PHOTOS - Photograph

Audrey Hepburn on the set of "Funny Face" in Paris. 1956.

Photograph

MAGNUM PHOTOS 

Artwork by David Seymour

More information

$ 650.00
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  • Composition: Fine Art Giclée print, brown frame, Acid-free 100% cotton paper
  • Dimensions: Height: 14.24 inches Width: 10.92 inches
  • Product code:58012618QN

You will receive your artwork in 15 to 20 days from ordering. Due to special handling and documentation, we require a little longer than our regular delivery times.

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About the work
Audrey Hepburn on the set of "Funny Face" in Paris. 1956 by David Seymour. Fine art giclée print on acid-free 100% cotton paper, brown wooden frame. 150-piece edition. Authenticated. Measurements of photographic print only: 17 x 25,5 cm. 1st arrondissement, Jardins des Tuileries, Dutch actress Audrey Hepburn starring "Funny Face", a musical film directed by Stanley Donen, containing assorted songs by George and Ira Gershwin.
About the artist
David Szymin was born in 1911 in Warsaw . After studying printing in Leipzig and chemistry and physics at the Sorbonne in the 1930s, Szymin stayed on in Paris. Szymin - or 'Chim' - began working as a freelance photographer. From 1934, his picture stories appeared regularly in Paris-Soir and Regards. Through Maria Eisner and the new Alliance agency, Chim met Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Capa. From 1936 to 1938 Chim photographed the Spanish Civil War, and after it was over he went to Mexico on an assignment with a group of Spanish Republican émigrés. At the outbreak of the Second World War he moved to New York, where he adopted the name David Seymour. Both his parents were killed by the Nazis. Seymour served in the US Army (1942-45), winning a medal for his work in intelligence. In 1947, along with Cartier-Bresson, Capa, George Rodger, and William Vandivert, he founded Magnum Photos. The following year he was commissioned by UNICEF to photograph Europe's children in need. He went on to photograph major stories across Europe, Hollywood stars on European locations, and the emergence of the State of Israel. After Robert Capa's death he became the new president of Magnum. He held this post until 10 November 1956, when, traveling near the Suez Canal to cover a prisoner exchange, he was killed by Egyptian machine-gun fire.
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